Lane Kiffin out of the Raiders

Lane Kiffin has now earned the title of former pro football head coach of the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He was hired by Raiders‘ owner Al on January 23, 2007, making history by being the youngest head coach in the Raiders staff, and the youngest head coach since the formation of the modern NFL. Later that year, On August 12, 2007, in his NFL head coaching debut, Kiffin and the Raiders won their NFL preseason opener 27-23 over the Arizona Cardinals.

Problems apparently started since the beginning of 2008, when it was reported that Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis drafted a letter of resignation for Kiffin to sign after his first season with a record of 4-12. Kiffin said he was not going to sign the letter because it would cause him to forfeit his salaries for the remainder of his contract (2 years remaining at $2 million per year on his contract). The Raiders denied the story.

There were many rumors in the past few months and then on September 15, 2008 NBC Sports reported Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis was unhappy with the head coach; Lane Kiffin was officially fired on September 30th, 2008.

Lane Kiffin was preciously an offensive coordinator for the USC Trojans and football flows through his veins given that he is the son of veteran college and NFL coach Monte Kiffin, who currently serves as defensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

The future is not certain for the young head coach Kiffin right now since the Oakland Raiders said the move was made for cause, meaning they will avoid paying Lane Kiffin for the remainder of his NFL contract. He signed a two-year deal worth about $4 million with a team option for 2009 when he took over last year.

 

What’s there after the NFL?

The NFL is exciting and living under the spotlight of the pro football games provides certain status and life style to the players not easily compared to a regular way of living: hard trainings, traveling from state to state for the NFL games, money and luxury that are hardly enjoyed because of the hard work. NFL players are willing to live this life to achieve their goals, break records and be part of the NFL history. Is it really worth it? According to some experts, just the fact that most of these men will be thrust into the so-called real world with few marketable skills to increase their wealth some sort of cultural shock is bound to take place in some cases.

The NFL is part of the American traditions, part of our homes, families and memories, yet the main characters of all those memories will vanish from our minds as soon as they leave the NFL career that gave them so much. Apparently, 78% of all NFL players are divorced, bankrupt or unemployed two years after leaving the National Football League.

As a former NFL player and 12-year veteran with the Green Bay Packers himself Ken Ruettgers found a way to help athletes overcome this transition as the executive director of www.gamesover.org. Games Over is a Non-profit organization that helps professional athletes address the transition from professional sports to other careers. Ruttgers explains that the most common losses after retiring any professional sports career (not only the NFL) will include:

  • Loss of celebrity status.

  • Instant name recognition vanishes.

  • Income is slashed.

  • Such perks as free meals and support staff end.

  • Self-doubt, fear and a lack of direction.

As corny as it may sound, this transition is not easy. As an NFL player you are waited on, served, assisted and usually it is very hard to be alone or even have a chance to feel alone, after a professional career in sports ends, all the attention ends with it. People are not aware that 50% of NFL players only have careers of a little more than three years, meaning that an average of about 320 veteran players lose their job each year. What are the odds? NFL stars, record breakers and idols can be really retiree material at the age of 35 years old?

NFL football and Arena football

 

 Most people will say -and I agree with them- that NFL football is 10 times tougher than Arena football, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the latest is not a sport to consider.

 

When we are in NFL off season, some fans would rather go to a tropical country for vacations or they will head to the golf course to improve their technique, but there is a larger group of those NFL football fans that will rather go and watch a good Arena football game.

 

I guess the point of Arena football players is to be watched for as much people as possible in order to wait for an NFL football contract, such as the case of Kurt Warner, who went from leading the Iowa Barnstormers to two Arena bowls, to then being hired as the starting quarterback for the St. Louis Rams, who he led to a victory in Super Bowl XXXIV and being named the Super Bowl MVP.

 

Arena football is faster than regular NFL football, and when you see a guy that rushed all through the playing field, you might as well watch that same player rushing into the defensive area of any NFL football team and score an NFL touchdown easily.

 

But there is one sure thing, in order for Arena football players to get good NFL football contracts, the Arena football commissioners would need to do something to improve the league’s sponsorship in order to bring more attention to the game.


Bookmark and Share

Top Three Largest NFL Stadiums. NFL records on stadium capacity. Largest NFL stadiums.

Top Three Largest NFL Stadiums

 

It is well known that given the perceived advantage an NFL team gets when playing in their home stadium, particular attention is given to the details of each stadium’s environment. It is quite interesting when an NFL game is played in one of the largest stadiums in America since not only the capacity of the stadium gets involved but many other factors such as noise, surface and home team advantages. These are the top three largest NFL stadiums:

 

1. The FedExField Stadium in Landover, Maryland is the home of the Washington Redskins it is in fact, the largest stadium in the National Football League (NFL). The capacity of this structure is 91665 NFL fans and it was open in 1997 under the name of Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, in memory of the recently deceased Redskins owner.

 

2. The next impressive NFL building is located in New York and it is the Jets and Giants teams of the NFL: frequently referred to as The Meadowlands, it is in fact known as the Giants Stadium. It can hold a total of 80242 fans it also used by the Red Bulls soccer team. After opening its gates for the first time in 1976, the Giants Stadium will be closed and demolished in 2010 when the new Meadowlands Stadium opens.

 

3. Last but definitely not least, is the Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. It is part of the Truman Sports Complex and the Kansas City Chiefs fans usually refer to it as The Red Sea. It has a 79451 sitting capacity and The Chiefs have a 104-40 home record at Arrowhead Stadium since 1990, the best in the NFL.

 

NFL records will mention this huge NFL homes impressive and modern structures, yet the fans will always see them as shelter for their idols.


Bookmark and Share